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Sunday, 23 March 2014

Campaign in Newfoundland 1696-97

While the New England colonies began to hit Acadie, the French decided to harass the English fishery in Newfoundland
Officer of the Compagnies franches de la Marine of Canada (www.cmhg.gc.ca)
Officer of the Compagnies franches de la Marine of Canada
Although officers of the Compagnies franches de la Marine of Canada were not required to wear any specific uniform, during the 1690s many wore the same colours as their soldiers at the time, namely grey-white and blue. The sword and spontoon, or half-pike, were regulation armaments. Reconstruction by Michel Pétard.


Soldier dressed for a winter campaign, between 1690 and 1700
Soldier dressed for a winter campaign, between 1690 and 1700
This is how a soldier of the Compagnies franches de la Marine would have looked when on the march during a winter expedition between 1690 and 1700. Note his mittens, snowshoes and hooded capot. Reconstruction by Francis Back.






The French forces for this game in 1/72 would consist of 12 stands of Canadian milice,


10 stands of Les Compagnies franches de la Marine
3 cannons.


The storming of St John's, Newfoundland, on 30 December 1696
The storming of St John's, Newfoundland, on 30 December 1696
French soldiers and 120 Canadian militiamen led by Pierre Le Moyne d’Iberville and Governor de Brouillan of Placentia raided the British part of Newfoundland between October 1696 and May 1697. The campaign was an outstanding military success and crippled the English colony. The French and Canadian forces took over 700 prisoners and caused some 200 casualties while suffering trifling losses. Print after Massicotte.






For this battle, I have used the Canadian military heritage group site for inspiration as well as Roger Marsters Bold Privateers: Terror, Plunder and Profit on Canada'a Atlantic Coast (Formac, Halifax, 2004)


For the English troops 16 stands of English troops


Soldier from Gibbon's Regiment of Foot in Newfoundland, 1697-98
Soldier from Gibbon's Regiment of Foot in Newfoundland, 1697-98
Gibbon's Regiment was the first regular British army unit to be stationed in present-day Canada. Noteworthy on the English musket of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries is the 'dog lock', a kind of small safety catch attached to the gun lock to hold the hammer. Reconstruction by Gerald A Embleton.


Gibbon's Regiment was probobly sent out to Newfoundland after this campaign, but for gamming, I'll include them.





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