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Sunday, 2 February 2014

Nova Scotia 1750s campaign

View of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, around 1753
View of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, around 1753
This view from the water shows Annapolis Royal (formerly Port-Royal) a few years before the outbreak of the Seven Years' War and the deportation of the Acadians. At right can be seen Fort Anne, originally built in 1702 to defend the capital of the French colony of Acadie. Water-colour. (National Archives of Canada)


Soldier of the 40th British infantry regiment, around 1745
Soldier of the 40th British infantry regiment, around 1745
The 40th Regiment of Foot was the longtime British garrison in Newfoundland and Nova Scotia. This common soldier firing a musket is shown in the dress of around 1745. For ordinary service, English soldiers wore brown gaiters instead of white, which easily got dirty. When the weather was chilly, they unhooked the turnbacks of their coats to cover their thighs and buttoned the lapels across the chest. Reconstruction by Gerald A. Embleton.


While the King George's War (1744-48) offically ended, an insurgency in Nova Scotia took shape.


Micmac warrior, around 1740
Micmac warrior, around 1740
This Micmac warrior of circa 1740 carries a French-made musket and wears a European shirt. Reconstruction by Francis Back.
Micmac chief around 1740
Micmac chief around 1740
This Micmac chief wears a mixture of Amerindian and European dress. Gifts of military clothing equipment were often made by the French colonial authories to allied leaders. Note the gorget around this man's neck - this small piece of armour was the symbol of an officer in European military fashion. Reconstruction by Francis Back.


Abble Le Loutre, the French priest, acted as the French agent in Nova Scotia to keep the situation destablised. This was one of the French strategic ways of keeping the New Englanders and British on guard, and at arms length.


As mentioned, previously, I will attempt to recreate some of these battles.

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